Groups navigating public transportation necessities as Denver and suburbs continue to grow

RTD says it has to constantly juggle resources

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DENVER -- As Colorado expands from Denver past the suburbs, public transportation will play a key role in managing growth and congestion.

Yet as metro Denver grows, some bus and light rail users are experiencing some shortfalls in service.

"The cities are very well-connected with bike trails, we noticed, and walking. But it would be a little better if the bus was a little bit more connected," said Thornton resident Brett Moniz.

"We could benefit from having some routes to … like the local malls or something of the other entertainment options that are here," said Alexandria Aragon, another Thornton resident.

The Regional Transportation District (RTD) is looking at expanding the future bus service along Highway 119 between Boulder and Longmont.

It hopes to extend commuter rail all the way into Thornton and Boulder - but finances are getting in the way.

And while some routes, like the W Line into Jefferson County, have seen low numbers, RTD feels it will pay off long-term.

"It's kind of a juggling act because we don't have the amount of resources to provide the levels of service we would like in some areas. But at the same measure, we have some areas [where] we aren't meeting our service standards. So it's constant juggling of what we have available," said RTD spokesperson Scott Reed.

Big picture, according to RTD: This isn't just about getting from point A to point B – it's about maintaining the environment.

"The more we can move folks to other modes of transportation – besides driving in a single car everyday – will help all of us and the air that we breathe," said Maria Handley of Conservation Colorado.

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