NewsNational

Actions

Wisconsin resident received $5.60 stimulus check

Wisconsin resident received $5.60 stimulus check
Posted at 6:45 PM, Jun 04, 2020
and last updated 2020-06-04 20:45:04-04

A Bay View, Wisconsin, resident was surprised last month when he opened his federal stimulus check and found some numbers were missing.

Clark Rendall found that his check that he said should have been $1,200 was cut for just $5.60.

"I looked at the check and it says it's for $5 and 60 cents and there wasn't any sort of accompanying documentation or explanation in regard to where that number came from," he said.

Rendall said he was contacted by the IRS back in March about a missing tax document, which he quickly sent to them.

Since then he has not received his federal income tax refund, and that if the document affected anything it would be his refund, and would be for a few hundred dollars, not the $1,200 amount of the stimulus check.

He's tried to get answers, but has not heard back.

"There's a phone number for the IRS but you call it, and it says if there's no one available to talk to you," he said.

The IRS has a cutoff for people who make more than $75,000 a year, and take off $5 on stimulus checks for every $100 above that threshold. Rendall told us he does not make that much money.

An IRS spokesperson said they cannot comment on individual cases. They directed us to their Frequently Asked Questions site , and pointed out that the IRS plans to send a letter within 15 days of payment explaining the amount.

Rendall has not received a letter thus far.

The site also says if you did not get what you believed you were owed, that you can claim it on your income taxes next year, but you should keep any letters you get from the IRS if you choose to go that route.

For the check itself, Rendall said he's not sure what he's going to do with it.

"I don't know, maybe I'll frame it, send it back to them," he said. "Who knows I'm going to hold on to it for a while and maybe see if I can get some information from them."</p>

This article was written by Marty Hobe and Kristin Byrne for WTMJ,