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'Mini Tuesday' a success story for Sanders

Posted: 8:23 PM, Mar 22, 2016
Updated: 2016-03-23 07:19:12Z
Clinton’s lead in the race for the Democratic nomination has steadily intensified, leaving voters with a lingering question: Does Bernie Sanders even still have a chance?
 
The answer to that question became a little clearer Tuesday night, as votes from Arizona, Idaho and Utah trickled in -- that answer is "Yes."
 
Clinton swept up the first victory in Arizona, but it wasn't over. A short time later, early projections from the AP showed Sanders winning Utah and Idaho.
 
"This campaign is about both growing and sharing the promise of America," Clinton addressed supporters following her victory in Arizona.
 
She went on to address Tuesday's terrorist attacks in Brussels, which killed more than 30 people and injured hundreds more, using the incident to highlight her own values.
 
"The last thing we need my friends, are leaders who incite more fear," she said to loud applause. 
 
"In the face of terror, America doesn’t panic. We don’t build walls or turn our backs on our allies," she ranted, in an obvious reference to Trump's plan of building a wall between the U.S. and Mexico. "What Donald trump and others are suggesting is not only wrong, it’s dangerous."
 
Clinton continued, "This is time for America to lead, not cower. And we will lead and defeat terrorism."
 
Sanders also addressed supporters after Arizona's results, exciting the San Diego crowd with bold statements like, "We are doing something very unusual in modern politics: we are telling the truth."
 
He closed his remarks by noting that if there is a large voter turnout in California, which is among the last few states to vote, "we will win."
 
After Tuesday's elections, Clinton stood at 1,214 pledged delegates and Sanders at 899 (not including superdelegates).
 
To win the nomination, 2,383 delegates are needed.
 
Which of these candidates, however, has a better chance of beating the Republican nominee -- looking to be Donald Trump -- in the general election?