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Denver Zoo raises $55,000 in support of animal rescue efforts in Australia

Posted: 3:43 PM, Jan 20, 2020
Updated: 2020-01-20 17:49:31-05
‘Millions of sparks’: Weather raises Australia’s fire danger

DENVER – The Denver Zoo announced Monday it had raised more than $55,000 to help in animal rescue efforts as Australia continues to deal with scores of wildfires across the southeastern part of the country.

Zoo officials announced more than a week ago they would be making an “immediate contribution” of $5,000 and matching up to $5,000 more through their Field Conservation Fund to Zoos Victoria, a world-leading zoo-based conservation organization that works to fight wildlife extinction.

In a news release Monday, Zoo officials said they had raised more than $55,000 for the organization, thanks in part to the generosity of the public who donated to the zoo. If you’d like to help but haven't done so, you can still do so by clicking here.

Additionally, Zoo officials reiterated they’re closely monitoring the events in Australia and will “evaluate other ways to assist in the near future,” which could include the zoo getting involved more directly.

MORE: Here’s how you can help the victim of the Australian wildfires

Recent extreme weather including dust storms, hail and flash floods have hit several Australian cities in recent days, which has diminished the threat from the more than 100 wildfires currently burning in the southeastern regions of the country.

But Australian authorities warned the fire danger would escalate this week in the states of Victoria and New South Wales as temperatures rise and drier conditions set in.

At least 28 people have died since September, more than 26,000 homes have been destroyed and more than 25.7 million acres of land have burned due to the wildfires. The AP reports the burned area is larger than the state of Indiana.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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