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Coronavirus in Colorado: Latest COVID-19 updates for July 13-19, 2020

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Posted at 4:10 PM, Jul 13, 2020
and last updated 2020-07-19 18:19:30-04

More than 37,000 people have tested positive for coronavirus in Colorado and 1,727 people have died among those with cases, according to data released by the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment on Monday.

Click here for the latest update on the number of cases, the age, gender and location of presumptive positive, indeterminate and confirmed cases from the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment.

Below, we're updating this blog with the latest information regarding COVID-19 in Colorado.


Latest updates:

Sunday, July 19

4 p.m. | Latest coronavirus numbers for Colorado

Here are the latest COVID-19 numbers from the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment. Note: The (+) denotes a change in cases from the previous day.

40,142 cases (+354)
6,032 hospitalized (+13)
63 counties (+0)
439,068 people tested (+6,220)
1,752 deaths among cases (+0)
1,615 deaths due to COVID-19 (+0)
427 outbreaks (+0)

The latest hospital data shows 401 hospital beds in use by confirmed or suspected COVID-19 patients, with 21 patients discharged from hospitals over the past 24 hours and 80% of state hospitals reporting.

Saturday, July 18

4 p.m. | Latest coronavirus numbers for Colorado

Here are the latest COVID-19 numbers from the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment. Note: The (+) denotes a change in cases from the previous day.

39,788 cases (+444)
6,019 hospitalized (+25)
63 counties (+0)
432,848 people tested (+5,149)
1,752 deaths among cases (+1)
1,615 deaths due to COVID-19 (+0)
427 outbreaks (+1)

The latest hospital data shows 394 hospital beds in use by confirmed or suspected COVID-19 patients, with 18 patients discharged from hospitals over the past 24 hours and 80% of state hospitals reporting.

Friday, July 17

4 p.m. | Dolores County confirms first case of coronavirus

Dolores County recorded its first case of the novel coronavirus on Friday, more than four months after the new respiratory disease was officially reported in Colorado. Kiowa County is now the only county that has not reported cases of COVID-19. Here are the latest numbers from the CPDHE:

39,344 cases (+618)
5,994 hospitalized (+28)
63 counties (+1)
427,699 people tested (+6,386)
1,751 deaths among cases (+6)
1,615 deaths due to COVID-19 (+0)
424 outbreaks (+4)

The latest hospital data shows 412 hospital beds in use by confirmed or suspected COVID-19 patients – 23 more from Thursday, with 29 patients discharged from hospitals over the past 24 hours and 85% of state hospitals reporting. Thursday’s 3-day moving average positivity rate was 5.11%. The state’s target is to remain below 5%.

GRAPH: COVID-19 hospital beds in use as of July 17, 2020

Click here to explore the latest COVID-19 case data for Colorado.

1:15 p.m. | Eagle County modifies public health order as cases grow

Eagle County, which was praised by state officials for curbing its initial spread of COVID-19 early in the pandemic, is bringing back some restrictions as cases there grow again.

Private gatherings will be limited to 10 people or less under a modified public health order. Public gatherings will be limited to 100 people or less indoors and 175 people or less outdoors.

The county will also work to increase testing capacity and ensuring test results within 48 hours.

“Our community goals are based on slowing the current spread of COVID-19 and keeping transmission rates within Eagle County at low levels,” said Heath Harmon, Director of Eagle County Public Health and Environment. “Taking actions now will directly support our longer-term goals including maintaining the current economy, keeping our workforce employed, opening schools, and preparing for a winter with ski resorts opened.”

Eagle County said COVID-19 transmission there has steadily risen in recent weeks with a "significant increase" in the past week. Eagle County has reported 69 new cases in the most recent five-day period, up from 26 cases in the previous five-day period. The county has had a total of 822 COVID-19 cases since the onset of the pandemic.

9:45 a.m. | Colorado unemployment rate rose slightly to 10.5% in June, with highest rates in mountain counties

Colorado’s seasonally adjusted unemployment rate was 10.5% in June – an increase of three-tenths of a percentage point from May’s rate of 10.2%.

According to the June household and business surveys, Colorado added 55,000 nonfarm payroll jobs in June, and the number of people employed in Colorado increased by 80,100. April’s unemployment rate was 12.2% in Colorado.

The Colorado Department of Labor and Employment says 61.4% of Coloradans aged 16+ are employed – up from April’s 58.3% but still far below the February level of 67.7%.

While Colorado’s unemployment rate jumped back up, the national rate fell 2.2% to 11.1%.

The CDLE said that Colorado has gained back just over one-third – 126,000 of 342,300 – of the nonfarm payroll jobs lost between February and April when the state moved to the stay-at-home order because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Leisure and hospitality was the industry with by far the greatest number of job gains, with about 40,600 jobs coming back. The CDLE said the only private industry sector that has seen significant job loss over the past month was the financial activities sector, which lost around 2,000 jobs.

The CDLE said the state’s labor force participation rate rose by 2.1% to 68.7%, which is below February’s rate of 69.4%.

Colorado’s June unadjusted unemployment rate was 10.7%. Those rates are still markedly higher in Gilpin (10.7%), San Miguel (17.1%), Summit (16.6%), Pitkin (16%) and Eagle (15.7%) counties, some of which have a greater share of seasonal employees.

Denver’s unemployment rate was 11.9%, compared to 11.6% in Adams County, 11.5% in Arapahoe County, 9.5% in Boulder County 8.7% in Douglas County, 10.4% in Jefferson County, 9.2% in Larimer County and 10.1% in Weld County.

Over the past year, Colorado nonfarm payroll jobs have decreased by 183,000 – almost half of them in the leisure and hospitality sector. Colorado’s year-over-year rate of job loss is -6.6%, compared to the national rate of -8.6%.

Click here to read the full story.

9:40 a.m. | UNC suspends athletic workouts

The University of Northern Colorado suspended athletic workouts due to positive COVID-19 cases. The university says it is working with local health officials on contact tracing and notifying people who came in contact with the positive cases in order to quarantine. A university spokesperson said the number of positive cases was not available because the investigation is still underway.

Thursday, July 16

9:24 p.m. | San Miguel County tweets support of statewide mask mandate

In a tweet late Thursday evening, Sheriff Masters with the San Miguel County Sheriff's Office says he "supports this new mandate and is encouraging all of us living, working, and visiting San Miguel County to #DoYourPart."

6:48 p.m. | Douglas County Commissioners respond to Gov. Polis' mandatory mask mandate

The Board of Douglas County Commissioners, who a week ago directed the county’s attorney to begin the process of withdrawing from the Tri-County Health Department over their displeasure with a mask mandate, says that while "consultation with local governments would have been preferred ... we urge our citizens and business communities to comply with the public safety Executive Order."

The board said in a statement they will continue to encourage personal responsibility as they monitor COVID-19 data in the county over the next month for a "reduction in the spread of COVID-19 hospitalizations, which as of today are 13."

5:41 p.m. | Republican Rep. Patrick Neville says he'll sue Polis over mask mandate

Republican Representative Patrick Neville responded to Gov. Polis' executive order mandating masks in public indoor spaces by saying the governor is "bowing to political pressures and letting the mob rule Colorado’s policies," adding the governor is on a power trip and "IMO his mask mandate is a clear violation of our civil liberties."

Neville stated intends to sue.

4:25 p.m. | Denver Public Schools releases proposed plan for in-person classes this fall

Denver Public Schools has released a detailed proposed plan for returning students to in-person classes this fall, and the guidelines feature an array of social distancing measures and health and safety protocols, including a requirement for all students and staff to wear masks and limits on the number of classes for secondary school students.

The district said this week it is considering a move to start classes on Aug. 24, one week later than usual also use a phased-in approach instead of having all students return at once. Parents and students will also have the option to choose virtual learning for the 2020-21 school year.

Read the full story here.

4:11 p.m. | Weld County will not enforce statewide mask mandate

Weld County Sheriff Steve Reams will not enforce Gov. Polis' mandatory mask mandate, Reams said through a statement posted on his Facebook page.

"My office will encourage citizens to take steps to protect their own health and safety but my deputies will not be taking actions to cite citizens for not wearing masks. ... Trying to handle additional call volume related to the statewide mask order will not be considered a priority call."

Reams said "egregious violations" can be referred to the health department for further investigation, but urged residents to be smart and be responsible.

"As always, we all need to be invested in our own safety whether that means carrying a concealed weapon or wearing a mask," Reams said.

4 p.m. | Latest coronavirus cases in Colorado

Nearly 600 more people tested positive with the novel coronavirus from Wednesday into Thursday, according to the latest numbers from the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE). Here is the latest data on COVID-19 from the state. Note: The (+) denotes a change in cases from the previous day.

38,726 cases (+571)
5,966 hospitalized (+16)
62 counties (+0)
421,313 people tested (+8,126)
1,745 deaths among cases (+1)
1,615 deaths due to COVID-19 (+14)
420 outbreaks (+6)

The latest hospital data shows 389 hospital beds in use by confirmed or suspected COVID-19 patients – 21 more from Wednesday, with 36 patients discharged from hospitals over the past 24 hours and 88% of state hospitals reporting. Wednesday’s 3-day moving average positivity rate was 4.86%.Click here to explore the latest COVID-19 case data for Colorado.

GRAPH: COVID-19 hospital beds in use as of July 16, 2020

3:57 p.m. | Parker DMV employee tests positive for COVID-19

A Colorado Division of Motor Vehicles (DMV) employee in the Parker Driver License Office has tested positive for COVID-19 and two others are being tested, a spokesperson for the division said in a news release, adding all three employees were last in the office on July 13 and were following DMV protocols of wearing masks, social distancing, and washing hands frequently.

The spokesperson said all Parker DMV employees have been sent home and will be proactively tested for COVID-19.

As of today, the Parker DMV office is closed until further notice, and customers who had an appointment will be called to reschedule.

3:37 p.m. | El Paso County will not enforce state's mask mandate

Deputies with the El Paso County Sheriff's Office will not issue citations for people not wearing a mask. In a tweet several hours after Polis issued an executive order that requires most people to wear one in all public indoor spaces, the sheriff's office said they would not be "expending resources of the S.O. (sheriff's office) on issuing citations to individuals not wearing masks."

Instead, the sheriff's office said, "the official position of the El Paso County Sheriff's Office is to continue to educate the public on the benefits of wearing face coverings in enclosed public places. We will stress that wearing a mask will slow the spread of COVID-19 and save lives."

1:10 p.m. | Gov. Jared Polis issues statewide mask mandate for Colorado

Colorado Gov. Jared Polis issued an executive order Thursday that requires most people to wear masks in all public indoor spaces, with some exceptions. The order is effective for 30 days starting 12 a.m. Friday and applies to all Coloradans 11 years old or older.

Some of the exceptions to the mask mandate include: Eating at a restaurant; exercising alone; receiving a service such as a facial or beard trimming, where a mask would interfere; first responders (at their discretion); religious officiants; speaking to a televised audience; and having to remove a mask for purposes of identification. Other exemptions to the mandate include those who medically can not tolerate a face covering — whether they have breathing troubles, are unconscious or incapacitated, or unable to remove a face covering on their own — and those who are hearing-impaired or are communicating with someone who is hearing-impaired.

Read the full story here.

10:28 a.m. | Gov. Polis to provide COVID-19 response update at 12:45 p.m.

Colorado Gov. Jared Polis is expected to provide an update on the state's response to COVID-19 in a news conference at 12:45 p.m. We will carry the news conference live.

8:52 a.m. | Colorado regular unemployment initial claims rise again but benefit payouts continue to drop

Colorado saw its highest number of regular initial unemployment claims last week since the first week of June – jumping back over 10,000 again last week, according to the Colorado Department of Labor and Employment.

The 10,506 regular initial unemployment claims are the highest of any week since the week ending June 6, when around 12,900 regular initial claims were filed. Last week, self-employed and gig worker Coloradans filed 5,420 Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) claims – down from 5,900 the week before.

Since mid-March, Coloradans have filed a combined 633,407 regular or PUA initial claims and has paid out a combined roughly $3.5 billion in regular unemployment benefits and PUA and Pandemic Unemployment Compensation benefits.

The state paid out another $79 million in regular benefits last week. Last Thursday, CDLE Senior Economist Ryan Gedney said that if the state pays out around $85 million in regular benefits each week, the state’s unemployment trust fund would be insolvent in August – at which time the state would borrow from the federal government to continue paying benefits.

But last week saw the lowest amount in total benefits paid out since the federal CARES Act benefits kicked in, and the $79 million in regular benefits was the lowest payout by the state since the week ending April 18. Regular unemployment continued weeks claimed fell to their lowest levels last week since the second week of April.

Click here to read the full story

7:43 a.m. | Palisade Peach Festival canceled over COVID-19 concerns

The annual Palisade Peach Festival has been canceled this year over COVID-19 concerns, the Palisade Chamber of Commerce announced Wednesday.

The popular event on the Western Slope typically brings in close to 15,000 people each August, but the chamber said that coronavirus-related concerns forced the cancellation of this year’s festival – not the late freeze that happened this spring.

The chamber says it is already planning for next year’s event and “will be ready to greet you in 2021.” The 52nd annual event had been scheduled for Aug. 13-15.

Click here to read the full story.

6:35 a.m. | Poudre School District cancels athletics, activities through July

The Poudre School District has canceled all summer athletics workouts and summer activities through July 31 over COVID-19 concerns.

The district said it is working with the Larimer County Department of Health and Environment to investigate possible coronavirus exposure among student athletes on athletic teams at two different high schools.

Athletics practices were allowed to restart June 22 before Wednesday’s decision. Coaches have been asked not to contact student athletes until July 31 at the earliest.

After fall marching band season was canceled over COVID-19 concerns, the district said it felt it was “prudent” to pause all activities as well as it awaits further guidance.

“Decisions and plans about athletics and activities for August and beyond will be made alter and share as soon as possible,” the district said in a news release.

Wednesday, July, 15

4:30 p.m. | Aurora Public Schools joins others across the metro, delays school start date by a week

Aurora Public Schools on Wednesday joined a growing list of school districts across the Denver metro in delaying the first day of school for student by one week.

The first day of school for most students, those in grades 1-12, will be Tuesday, Aug. 18. Students in Kindergarten and preschool will follow six days later, starting school on Monday, Aug. 24. Classes were originally scheduled to begin on Aug. 11.

Students in elementary, middle and P-8 schools will all have the opportunity to attend school in person for full days every day through what the district is calling “a cohort model,” meaning that a group of students will stay with the same group of classmates and teachers for the entire school day.

High school students will have the opportunity to attend school in person for half days every day through a cohort model and block schedule, meaning they would learn what they need to through a combination of in-person and remote learning, the district said in the letter.

Read the full story here.

4 p.m. | Latest coronavirus numbers

38,155 cases (+469)
5,950 hospitalized (-13)
62 counties (+0)
413,187 people tested (+6,220)
1,744 deaths among cases (+6)
1,601 deaths due to COVID-19 (+7)
414 outbreaks (+11)

State officials said the negative cumulative change in hospitalization numbers could be a result of new or different information learned through case investigations performed at the local level, labs and state and local public health agencies. As more information is gathered, case totals are sometimes update.

The latest hospital data shows 368 hospital beds in use by confirmed or suspected COVID-19 patients, down 10 from Tuesday, with 36 patients discharged from hospitals over the past 24 hours and 88% of state hospitals reporting. Tuesday’s 3-day moving average positivity rate was 4.72%.

Click here to explore the latest COVID-19 case data for Colorado. Click here for more information on hospital data.

3 p.m. | King Soopers will require masks for all customers
Kroger, which owns Colorado's King Soopers grocery chain, announced on Wednesday that it will begin requiring all customers to wear masks on July 22.

Store employees have been required to wear masks for months amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

"With the increase in COVID-19 cases across the country, we are committed to doing our part to help reduce the spread of the virus," Kroger announced in a tweet Wednesday afternoon.

12:45 p.m. | Mayor Hancock hitting the “pause button” on new variances amid spike in COVID-19 cases in Denver

Denver Mayor Michael Hancock said he is hitting “the pause button” when it comes to submitting new variance requests to the state amid a recent spike in the number of COVID-19 cases. Businesses and venues that have already received variances to reopen, like the Denver Zoo and the Botanical Gardens, will be allowed to continue to operate.

Mayor Hancock made the announcement during a press briefing Wednesday, where he opened by revealing the city is seeing an increase in case numbers, positivity rates and hospitalization rates.

“We continue to see a troubling increase in data, and it’s data that will determine the decisions we may need to make going forward,” Hancock said.

In Denver, the 7-day running average for case rates has increased from 53.7 (two weeks ago) to 68.6 as of Wednesday, according to Hancock. The city is seeing a positivity rate of around 4-5% and holding steady. However, that rate was 2.7% in June, the mayor said. Hospital rates are also rising, but the mayor said capacity is being met.

Statewide, Colorado is in a similar pattern. Tuesday’s hospital data showed 378 hospital beds in use by confirmed or suspected COVID-19 patients, up 45 from Monday. Data from the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment also shows 444 new cases of the virus were reported Tuesday.

“This recent spike that we’re seeing is extremely concerning,” Hancock said. “But we’re in a place where if we stay focused, we can reverse the trend.”

The mayor did not provide a timeline on the moratorium on submitting new variances for businesses and attractions to reopen. Variances or waivers, granted by the state, allow applicants to relax some of the state's guidelines from the safer-at-home order, such as having restaurants and bars open for business and allowing places like gyms and houses of worship to spring back into life.

Echoing Gov. Jared Polis, the mayor stressed the need for residents to wear masks and acknowledged neighboring communities and health departments who have implemented mask mandates similar to the one Denver has instituted. He said he is beefing up mask-wearing enforcement efforts across the city, and officials will be visiting sites to observe compliance.

Click here to read the full story

10:55 a.m. | Brighton opts out of TCHD face covering order

The Brighton City Council voted 9-0 Tuesday night to opt out of the Tri-County Health Department’s public health order requiring people to wear face coverings in most public settings, which will take effect July 24.

The council will re-evaluate the choice to opt-out every two weeks at meetings.

The city said that face coverings are still required in all city facilities and that residents are “strongly” encouraged to wear face coverings in public when social distancing isn’t possible.

10:37 a.m. | Denver COVID-19 update at 11:30 a.m.

Denver Mayor Michael Hancock and Department of Health and Environment Executive Director Bob McDonald will provide an update at 11:30 a.m. on the city’s response to COVID-19 and a recent local spike in cases.

10:30 a.m. | Denver Public Schools considering pushing school year start back a week to Aug. 24

Denver Public Schools is considering pushing the first day of school for most schools back a week to Aug. 24 to give teachers more time to prepare and to cut down on the number of hot August school days, the superintendent wrote to teachers Wednesday morning.

Superintendent Susana Cordova says the district expects to share more details about a possible delayed start next Monday, July 20.

“This delay would increase the amount of time teachers have to prepare for a highly unusual schools year – and decrease the number of hot August days that our students and staff will be in classrooms,” Cordova wrote in the letter to teachers.

The letter comes the morning after Douglas County Public Schools said it would delay its start by a week, pushing the first day of classes back to Aug. 17 from Aug. 10.

“This delay will afford all DCSD staff the opportunity to train and prepare for a safe and healthy in-person learning environment,” Douglas County district officials wrote in a letter to parents Tuesday.

School officials in some of California’s larger districts have already said they will begin the year with remote learning.

Cordova wrote to teachers that they still currently believe they can start the year with in-person learning, as they said last month they would try to do, but are staying nimble in their planning after hearing “many questions and concerns about returning to school.”

“In consultation with our health partners, we believe that the current rate of spread in our community does allow us to continue forward with a plan for in-person learning, but please know that we are monitoring the ever-changing environment daily,” Cordova wrote.

“We are making contingency plans should the rates of COVID infection increase to a point where health officials recommend that in person attendance is not feasible,” she added.

Cordova wrote that the district was considering a staggered start schedule “in which schools would all begin virtually and phase in in-person attendance gradually.”

Click here to read the full story.

Tuesday, July 14

9:40 p.m. | Broomfield votes to approve mask mandate

The City and County of Broomfield has voted to approve a mask mandate that calls for the general public to wear a mask or face covering when indoors at public places in Broomfield, said Broomfield City Councilwoman Heidi Henkel.

8:29 p.m. | Castle Rock votes to opt out of Tri-County Health Department's mask mandate

Castle Rock Town Council has voted unanimously to opt out of the Tri-County Health Department's mask mandate, which is scheduled to go into effect July 24.

6:41 p.m. | Aurora DMV office closes temporarily after employee tests positive for COVID-19

The Aurora Department of Motor Vehicle office will temporarily close starting Wednesday, July 15 through Friday, July 17 after Arapahoe County confirmed an employee tested positive for COVID-19, exposing other employees to the new respiratory disease. The office is located at 490 S. Chambers Road in Aurora.

The employee is self-quarantining and employees who had contact with that person are being encouraged to get tested.

The County is reaching out to customers who had appointments for motor vehicle services at the Aurora office for rescheduling.

6 p.m. | Glendale discussing opting out of Tri-County Health mask mandate

Glendale City Council is discussing opting out of the Tri-County Health Department's mask mandate, which goes into effect on July 24. Watch live below:

4:10 p.m. | COVID-19 cases, hospitalizations increasing in Boulder County

Boulder County health officials say cases of the novel coronavirus have increased in the county, with health officials reporting 25 new COVID-19 cases on Monday. Hospitalizations have also increased, officials say, adding the average number of people hospitalized in Boulder County hospitals on a given day in the past 14 days has been about 7 people per day; this is more than 25% higher than the average during the previous 14-day period, which was about five people on a given day.

Residents are encouraged to keep proper social distance, wash their hands often and avoid long contact if interacting with people outside the home.

4:08 p.m. | Newest COVID-19 data

Here are the latest coronavirus numbers for Colorado, as of 4 p.m. Tuesday, with the change from Monday in parentheses:

37,686 cases (+444)
5,963 hospitalized (+22)
62 counties (+1)
406,967 tested (+5,025)
1,738 deaths among cases (+11)
1,594 deaths due to COVID-19 (+5)
403 outbreaks (+2)

The latest hospital data shows 378 hospital beds in use by confirmed or suspected COVID-19 patients, up 45 from Monday. Monday’s 3-day moving average positivity rate was 4.25% — a number Colorado officials hope to keep below 5%.

Click here to explore the latest COVID-19 case data for Colorado. Click here for more information on hospital data.

4 p.m. | New Jefferson County face covering mandate goes into effect at 5 p.m.

All residents of and visitors to Jefferson County over age 4, with some health-related exemptions, will have to wear face coverings in most public settings starting at 5 p.m. Tuesday after the county health department issued a public health order Tuesday afternoon.

Jeffco is the latest metro-area health department to require the face coverings, which have become more and more of a political flashpoint in Colorado as many counties and municipalities mandate their use due to science-based evidence they help restrict the spread of the virus, while others decry what they believe is government overreach on personal liberties.

“As cases have started to increase sharply across the Denver Metro Area and in Jefferson County, we are looking at the tools we have to prevent the surges that are happening in other parts of our country, including bordering states, from happening here,” said Dr. Mark B. Johnson, Executive Director at JCPH. “While we have always strongly encouraged our residents to wear face coverings, we are joining others in the Denver Metro Area to take it a step further and make them mandatory.”

Jefferson County’s mask mandate will require residents above age 4 to wear a mask or face covering whenever they are in public and cannot maintain 6 feet of social distancing. Jeffco residents will not have to wear them when inside private residences or within their personal vehicle when driving alone or with household members.

There are also exemptions for when people are working alone in a single enclosed space, for when they would create unsafe working conditions, for when a person’s health would inhibit them from wearing one (if they have documentation), for the hearing impaired if lip-reading is necessary, in certain first responder emergencies and in certain other situations, like when eating and drinking at a restaurant.

Jefferson County Public Health says it will “seek voluntary compliance through education, technical assistance and warning notices,” but that the order “may be enforced by any legal means.”

People who violate the law could face a fine of up to $1,000 and up to a year in county jail, the order says. Businesses that allow people to come inside without necessary face coverings could be subject to having its license suspended or revoked.

The order will be in effect from 5 p.m. on Tuesday until 6 a.m. next Wednesday but can be extended, rescinded, superseded or amended.

Click here to read the full story.

Monday, July 13

4 p.m. | Latest coronavirus numbers

Here were the latest coronavirus numbers for Colorado, as of 4 p.m. Monday, with the change from Sunday in parentheses:

37,242 cases (+329)
5,941 hospitalized (+46)
61 counties (+0)
401,942 tested (+5,579)
1,727 deaths among cases (+2)
1,589 deaths due to COVID-19 (+3)
401 outbreaks (+2)

The latest hospital data shows 333 beds in use by confirmed or suspected COVID-19 patients, up 9 from Sunday. Thirty-one people have been released since Sunday.

Click here to explore the latest COVID-19 case data for Colorado. Click here for more information on hospital data.