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Coronavirus in Colorado: COVID-19 updates for Nov. 30-Dec. 6, 2020

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Posted at 9:59 AM, Nov 30, 2020
and last updated 2020-12-06 19:46:33-05

More than 228,000 people have been infected with coronavirus in Colorado since the onset of the pandemic, according to the latest data from the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment.

READ MORE: List of Colorado businesses that are open

Click here for the latest update on the number of cases, the age, gender and location of presumptive positive, indeterminate and confirmed cases from the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment.

Below, we're updating this blog with the latest information regarding COVID-19 in Colorado.


Latest updates:

Sunday, Dec. 6

4:30 p.m. | Latest COVID-19 numbers for Colorado

Here are the latest coronavirus numbers for Colorado, as of 4 p.m. Sunday, with the change from Saturday in parentheses.

260,581 cases (+3,234)
14,868 hospitalized (+24)
64 counties (+0)
1,858,341 people tested (+42,697)
3,478,160 test encounters (+36,046)
3,356 deaths among cases (-1)
2,724 deaths due to COVID-19 (0)
2,386 outbreaks (+3)

There are 1,750 beds in use with confirmed or suspected COVID-19 patients in the hospital, which is 245 less than what was reported on Dec. 2. Saturday's three-day average positivity rate in Colorado was 11.28%, which is down slightly from Friday. The state's goal is to remain below 5%.

Dec. 6 COVID-19 numbers for Colorado

2 p.m. | Polis extends learning pods and alternate care sites Executive Orders

Gov. Jared Polis extended to Executive Orders in response to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

In one Executive Order, Polis extended the ability to allow families to form groups to facilitate child supervision and remote learning during the school day, known as learning pods.

Polis also extended the Executive Order to allow for the operation of alternate care sites in response to COVID-19. This order also allowed for the decommissioning of two alternative care sites, The Ranch Complex in Loveland and the Western Memory Care Center in Grand Junction.

"Decommissioning these two sites will save the State money while ensuring that we still have the necessary capacity to respond to a surge of COVID-19 patients," the Executive Order says.

Saturday, Dec. 5

4:06 p.m. | Latest COVID-19 numbers for Colorado

Here are the latest coronavirus numbers for Colorado, as of 4 p.m. Saturday, with the change from Friday in parentheses.

257,347 cases (+5,125)
14,844 hospitalized (+82)
64 counties (+0)
1,815,644 tested (NO DATA)
3,442,114 test encounters (+45,040)
3,357 deaths among cases (+19)
2,724 deaths due to COVID-19 (+0)
2,383 outbreaks (+26)

The latest hospital data showed 1,812 beds in use by COVID-19 patients or suspected COVID-19 patients. Friday's three-day average positivity rate in Colorado was 11.74%. The state's goal is to remain below 5%.

1:21 p.m. | Estimated 1 of 40 Coloradans are infectious with coronavirus

Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) and the Colorado School of Public Health (ColoradoSPH) have released an updated modeling report.

Key findings from the modeling report:

  • An estimated 1 of 40 Coloradans are infectious, the highest prevalence to date.
  • The effective reproductive number is approximately 1.2, lower than last week but indicating continued growth of the epidemic. Infections are continuing to rise, albeit at a slower rate than last week. Estimated transmission control has increased from 66% to 71% since last week.
  • These estimates reflect infections occurring before Thanksgiving and do not yet reflect any impact of Thanksgiving travel or gatherings.
  • Over the next two weeks, COVID-19 hospital demand will likely reach or exceed 2,120 beds, including 6,65 ICU beds. Because of increased contacts over Thanksgiving, demand could be greater.
  • On the current trajectory, COVID-19 hospital and ICU demand may stay within surge capacity estimates over the next four weeks, even with modest increases in contacts over the Thanksgiving holiday. But further reductions in transmission control, associated with increases in contacts over the holidays could lead to hospital and ICU demand above surge capacity estimates.

Friday, Dec. 4

5:48 p.m. | Gov. Polis, First Gentleman Reis recovering from COVID-19

Gov. Jared Polis and First Gentleman Marlon Reis say they remain in good spirits following a positive COVID-19 diagnosis last week.

"Marlon and I are thankful for the support and kind words we have received during this time. We continue to hold those who have lost a friend or family member to this deadly virus in their hearts as well as those who have dealt with the more severe and lingering health effects,” said Gov. Polis in a prepared statement. “Colorado will get through this and we have to stay vigilant for a little bit longer so please continue to wear masks, social distance and avoid gatherings.”

Governor Polis and First Gentleman Reis experienced mild symptoms in the form of lack of sleep and minor headaches, and remain in good spirits, the governor's office said in a statement.

4:56 p.m. | Free COVID-19 testing Saturday at the Montbello Campus Back Student Parking Lot

A free COVID-19 testing site will open Saturday at the Montbello Campus back student parking lot (corner of 51st and Bolling Dr.) from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., according to Denver City Council member Stacie Gilmore.

4:07 p.m. | Colorado places its first COVID-19 vaccine order

The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) officially announced Friday it had placed the state’s first order for 46,800 doses of the Pfizer vaccine in anticipation of the Food and Drug Administration’s Emergency Use Authorization (EUA).

As Denver7 reported yesterday, the COVID-19 vaccine shipment could be here as soon as Dec. 11-14.

Dr. Eric France, the chief medical officer for the CDPHE, said many vaccines put a weakened or inactivated germ in the body, but the Moderna and Pfizer are mRNA vaccines, which utilizes new technology. These vaccines teach cells how to make protein to trigger an immune response in the body that produces antibodies. Those antibodies protect against infection if the real virus enters the body.

CDPHE has said the vaccine will be distributed based on a vaccination plan going to the most at-risk Coloradans, like health care workers, first responders and residents of long-term care and nursing homes. The current vaccination plan is a draft that will be updated when state officials have more information on various factors, including available vaccines the federal government sends to Colorado, according to CDPHE.

“The availability of a COVID-19 vaccine is a major turning point in this pandemic, and we will act as swiftly as possible to get it distributed once it is approved,” said Jill Hunsaker Ryan, executive director of the CDPHE in a prepared statement. “We are working closely with local public health agencies, hospitals and other health care providers, pharmacies, and diverse community partners to distribute and administer the vaccine as equitably and efficiently as possible. Because of limited quantities, it will take several months to get the vaccine to everyone who wants it -- so we need Coloradans to continue to take all possible measures to prevent the spread of the virus.”

4 p.m. | Latest COVID-19 numbers

Here are the latest coronavirus numbers for Colorado, with the change from Thursday in parentheses:

257,222 cases (+5,013)
14,762 hospitalized (+183)
64 counties (+0)
1,815,644 tested (+18,267)
3,397,074 test encounters (+53,979)
3,338 deaths among cases (+18)
2,724 deaths due to COVID-19 (+8)
2,357 outbreaks (+21)

The latest hospital data showed 1,883 beds in use by COVID-19 patients or suspected COVID-19 patients, 73 fewer than Thursday. Thursday's three-day average positivity rate for COVID-19 tests was 12.17%. Colorado's goal has been to remain below 5%.

GRAPH: COVID-19 hospital beds in use as of December 4, 2020

10:45 a.m. | No more "green" counties on state's COVID-19 dial

Colorado officially has no "green" counties on the state's COVID-19 dial, which indicates a county's level of virus transmission and the restrictions that follow. La Plata County had been on Level Green, the lowest level on the dial, but was moved to Level Yellow, the third level on the state dial. Hinsdale remains the lone Colorado county on Level Blue, the second level on the dial.

More than a dozen counties, including all of the Front Range and El Paso and Pueblo counties, remain on Level Red, which bans indoor dining and adds other restrictions for businesses. No counties are on Level Purple, which would carry restrictions similar to a stay-at-home order.

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Thursday, Dec. 3

6:15 p.m. | Colorado could receive COVID-19 vaccines in a few weeks; here's what health experts have to say

Colorado is expecting to receive 46,800 doses in the first COVID-19 vaccine shipment once the FDA authorizes use, which could be as soon as Dec. 11-14, according to the Tri-County Health Department (TCHD).

Both Moderna and Pfizer have announced their vaccines are 94% and 95% effective, respectively, and filed for Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

As the rollout looms, it’s raising questions for Coloradans about what to expect and if they should be concerned about how quickly the vaccine was developed.

Medical professionals like Emily Cheshire, a family nurse practitioner and a University of Colorado College of Nursing assistant professor, said they’re fielding a lot of questions from patients wanting to know more about the safety of the vaccine.

“I get questions around the safety because it came out so quickly,” Cheshire said. “I would say a wide variety [of questions], and I think they’re all very valid.”

She said many of those questions are coming from women who are pregnant, especially because pregnant women weren’t included in clinical trials of the vaccine.

“We don’t have data to support the safety and efficacy in pregnant women specifically, but that’s OK. We don’t have to know because it’s not available to you yet," Cheshire said. “As populations of people get the vaccine, we’re going to have more and more data available.”

Cheshire said she trusts the science, but understands patients’ concerns. She said people with questions should bring those to their doctors.

Elizabeth Carlton, an associate professor at the University of Colorado Anschutz Colorado School of Public Health, said the trials of the vaccine were designed to address some of the concerns, like the safety for people over 65.

“I know that things that are new can often induce fear," Carlton said. “Quite frankly, I would rather have a vaccine and have a brief, uncomfortable stab in my arm than to end up in the hospital with COVID.”

In a Nov. 20 press conference, Denver Department of Public Health and Environment Executive Director Bob McDonald said scientists weren't starting from scratch when they began developing a COVID-19 vaccine. Work began years ago on a vaccine for a similar virus, Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, or SARS.

“They picked up where they left off with the development of a vaccine for SARS-CoV-2, so I'm confident when this rolls out that this will be effective," McDonald said. "I see 2021 looking a lot different than where we are right now."

Dr. Eric France, the chief medical officer for Colorado Department of Health and Environment (CDPHE), said many vaccines put a weakened or inactivated germ in the body, but the Moderna and Pfizer are mRNA vaccines, which utilizes new technology. These vaccines teach cells how to make protein to trigger an immune response in the body that produces antibodies. Those antibodies protect against infection if the real virus enters the body.

About 30,000 people participated in Moderna's trials and Pfizer's included about 44,000 people.

For anyone concerned about politics playing a role, Dr. Anthony Fauci, the nation's top infectious disease specialist, said the results of the trials were monitored carefully by an independent safety monitoring board, not the federal government or pharmaceutical companies. The FDA also waits 60 days before granting an EUA because more than 90% of all adverse events involved in vaccines are experienced within 30 to 45 days.

“I will get vaccinated when my time arrives,” Fauci said. “I promise you that.”

Whether Coloradans choose to inoculate remains to be seen, but Rep. Kyle Mullica, D-Northglenn, who is also an ER nurse and an advocate for immunizations, said a mandate is unlikely, though he does believe people should get the COVID-19 vaccine once it’s approved.

CDPHE has said the vaccine will be distributed based on a vaccination plan going to the most at-risk Coloradans, like health care workers, first responders and residents of long-term care and nursing homes. The current vaccination plan is a draft that will be updated when state officials have more information on various factors, including available vaccines the federal government sends to Colorado, according to CDPHE.

The TCHD said the first shipment of vaccine will go to 10-15 different hubs in various counties identified by the CDPHE Wednesday to be held until the CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices issues recommendations, which will likely take a day or two.

Click here to read the full story.

4:36 p.m. | Free COVID-19 community testing site opening in Pueblo

Pueblo County will open a free COVID-19 community testing site starting Dec. 7, the CDPHE announced Thursday.

The testing site will be open Monday through Saturday from 8 a.m to 5 p.m. at the Pueblo Mall, 3201 Dillon Drive.

"The state encourages all Coloradans who need or want to get a COVID-19 test to go to any of the many community testing sites and events like these located throughout the state," the CDPHE said in a statement. "There are no identification or insurance requirements, and the tests are free."

For a list of COVID-19 community testing sites across the state, click here.

4:26 p.m. | Three new COVID-19 community testing sites opening to the public

The CDPHE announced Thursday it would be opening three more COVID-19 community testing sites across the state as Colorado continues to report a high number of cases and hospitalizations for the novel coronavirus. The sites that will be opening on the first week of December are:

  • Logan County Fairgrounds, 1120 Pawnee Ave. in Sterling - Saturday, Dec. 5 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
  • Milliken Athletic Complex, 320 Centennial Dr. in Milliken, Colo. - Monday, Dec. 7 and Wednesday Dec. 9 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
  • Montbello High School, 5000 Crown Blvd. in Denver - Starting Thursday, Dec. 3 and going from Monday - Friday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.

The CDPHE says that while those sites will accept walk-ins, they highly recommend signing up for appointments in advance. To set up an appointment, click here and then click "Get My Test."

4:20 p.m. | Latest COVID-19 data

Here are the latest coronavirus numbers for Colorado, as of 4 p.m. Thursday, with the change from Wednesday in parentheses:

247,209 cases (+6,037)
14,579 hospitalized (+216)
64 counties (+0)
1,797,377 people tested (+17,994)
3,343,095 test encounters (+54,195)
3,320 deaths among cases (+127)
2,716 deaths due to COVID-19 (+8)
2,336 outbreaks (+26)

The latest hospital data showed 1,956 beds in use by confirmed or suspected COVID-19 patients, down 39 from Wednesday. Colorado's three-day average positivity rate for Wednesday was 13.06%. The state's goal is to remain below 5%.

GRAPH: COVID-19 hospital beds in use as of December 3, 2020

2:30 p.m. | Latest COVID-19 projections

Top Colorado health officials on Thursday released data projecting 2,000 or more COVID-19 deaths in Colorado by the end of the year, as holiday gatherings are expected to bring a stronger surge of cases and hospitalizations in the coming weeks.

The death projections for the next month would nearly double Colorado's current toll. As of Thursday, 2,708 Coloradans had died due to COVID-19, and there were 3,193 deaths reported among COVID-19 cases.

The grim forecast — presented by Dr. Jonathan Samet, dean of the Colorado School of Public Health, and Dr. Rachel Herlihy, the state epidemiologist — came as health officials are still bracing for the impact of holiday gatherings over Thanksgiving. Herlihy said Colorado saw another spike in COVID-19 cases reported Thursday, but that the full impact of Thanksgiving gatherings is not expected to be reflected in the state data until early next week.

If Colorado's current transmission control of 71% is maintained — plus a 10% uptick in cases over the holidays — then around 2,500 more people could die of the virus by the end of the year, the data showed. If transmission control is upped to 80%, about 2,000 more people would die. And under a worse scenario of a reduction to 60% transmission control — plus a 30% surge in cases over the holidays — around 4,500 more people could die, the health officials said.

Read our full story here.

2:12 p.m. | Polis signs Senate Bill 4

Gov. Jared Polis has signed into law Senate Bill 4, which requires the state to transfer $100 million from the general fund to the controlled maintenance fund.

This money will be available to Gov. Polis to transfer to the state's disaster emergency fund for COVID-19 response, when necessary. Polis has already transferred money out of the maintenance fund twice during the pandemic.

7:35 a.m. | Colorado unemployment numbers

The Colorado Department of Labor and Employment reported that 17,130 regular initial unemployment claims were filed the week ending Nov. 28. The week prior, 15,219 regular initial unemployment claims were filed. Since mid-March, a total of 643,484 regular initial unemployment claims have been filed, according to the CDLE.

Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) initial and continued claims for prior weeks were revised down after a review and analysis of recent PUA activity was completed by CDLE. PUA initial claims were revised down a combined total of 11,667 for the period of Sept. 27 to Nov. 7. PUA claims filed in subsequent weeks are as follows:

  • Week ending Nov. 14 (4,188)
  • Week ending Nov. 21 (7,369)
  • Week ending Nov. 28 (14,242)

For the week ending on Nov. 21, a combined total of 208,330 continued claims were filed from the regular UI (79,121), PUA (62,403), and Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation (66,806) programs.

PUA continued claims were revised down an average of 9,200 per week for the period of Sept. 27-Nov. 7. Weekly PUA initial and continued claims figures can be viewed on pages 3 and 6 in the attached PDF at the bottom of this press release.

Wednesday, Dec. 2

10:10 p.m. | CDPHE ID's 16 Colorado counties that could receive COVID-19 vaccines

Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment identified 16 locations throughout the state with ultra-low temperature freezers that could receive and store the first shipment of a COVID-19 vaccine.

The identified locations across the state were chosen for their unique abilities to store, monitor, and handle vaccines in ultra-cold temperatures (-76°F to -112°F) as well as their willingness to redistribute COVID-19 vaccine(s) to other Phase 1 providers in their regions.

The specific locations of the sites are confidential for security reasons. However, the sites are distributed amongst the following counties:

  • Alamosa
  • Arapahoe
  • Denver
  • Eagle
  • El Paso
  • Gunnison
  • Jefferson
  • La Plata
  • Lincoln
  • Logan
  • Mesa
  • Pueblo
  • Otero
  • Routt
  • Weld

5:15 p.m. | A 14-day quarantine remains the 'gold standard' despite new, shorter options

A full 14-day quarantine remains the ‘gold standard,’ though the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has released additional options to reduce the length of quarantine, according to the Colorado Department of Health and Environment.

CDPHE said a 14-day quarantine is the most effective way to reduce disease spread, but they’ll be updating their guidance to explain when other options might be appropriate, according to a Wednesday press release.

CDPHE said a quarantine could only be shortened in the following situations:

  • If exposed people do not develop symptoms, they should take a test at least five days after their exposure. They may be released from quarantine after completing day seven if they have a negative molecular or antigen test collected within 48 hours of ending quarantine.
  • People may stop quarantining after 10 days without a test if they do not develop any symptoms.

A quarantine shouldn’t end under any circumstances before seven days have fully passed.

CDPHE said testing immediately after exposure isn’t helpful because it may be too early in the incubation period, which is why waiting five days after exposure is recommended. Anyone with symptoms should get tested as soon as possible, stay away from others and isolate.

4 p.m. | Latest COVID-19 numbers

Here are the latest coronavirus numbers for Colorado, as of 4 p.m. Wednesday, with the change from Tuesday in parentheses:

241,172 cases (+3,862)
14,363 hospitalized (+247)
64 counties (+0)
1,779,383 people tested (+11,285)
3,288,900 test encounters (+33,359)
3,193 deaths among cases (+84)
2,708 deaths due to COVID-19 (+13)
2,310 outbreaks (+103)

The latest hospital data showed 1,995 beds in use by confirmed or suspected COVID-19 patients, up 18 from Tuesday. Colorado's three-day average positivity rate for Tuesday was 13.20%. The state's goal is to remain below 5%.

12:25 p.m. | Denver reduces alcohol restrictions

Denver officials on Wednesday reduced certain alcohol restrictions, aligning with state orders on the issue. Liquor stores can now stay open and deliver alcohol until midnight and restaurants can now deliver alcohol until 2 a.m. Liquor store and restaurant deliver hours were previously capped at 10 p.m. and liquor stores had to close by the hour as well.

Denver remains on Level Red of the state's COVID-19 dial, meaning indoor dining is prohibited and last call for outdoor alcohol service at restaurants ends at 8 p.m.

6:45 a.m. | Applications open for relief money in Douglas County

Restaurant and indoor event venue owners in Douglas County who have experienced impacts due to recent public health orders can now apply for a share of $15 million allocated to provide relief. For details, click here.

6:06 a.m. | Polis, CDLE announce direct cash payments for Coloradans facing economic hardships

Gov. Polis and the Colorado Department of Labor and Employment (CDLE) announced that the state has begun issuing one-time stimulus payments of $375 to Coloradans facing economic hardships related to the COVID-19 pandemic.

All Coloradans who were eligible to receive $25 to $500 in weekly unemployment insurance benefits between March 15 and Oct. 24 are eligible to receive this one-time payment.

"This direct cash payment will help cover rent or put food on the table for over 400,000 Coloradans who have struggled, but we know that Colorado or any state can only do so much, and national help is urgently needed,” Polis said. “I’m thankful for the partnership of legislative leadership and the legislature’s efforts this week to provide real relief to Coloradans and our small businesses. We see light at the end of the tunnel with news of a vaccine, but the consequences of this pandemic will be far lingering if Washington fails to act.”

Tuesday, Dec. 1

6:10 p.m. | State to require electronic COVID-19 data submissions

The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment issued a new public health order Tuesday that will require anyone who performs COVID-19 testing to start submitting their data electronically by Jan. 2, 2021.

The CDPHE said the change would require some facilities to change from submitting their data by phone or fax and said it would help streamline data and make it more accurate.

State law requires all COVID-19 test specimens of any sort have their results submitted to the CDPHE immediately or in a single batch per day.

Click here to read the public health order.

4 p.m. | Latest COVID-19 numbers

Here are the latest coronavirus numbers for Colorado, as of 4 p.m. Tuesday, with the change from Monday in parentheses:

237,310 cases (+4,405)
14,116 hospitalized (+628)
64 counties (+0)
1,768,098 people tested (+14,051)
3,255,541 test encounters (+36,690)
3,109 deaths among cases (+72)
2,695 deaths due to COVID-19 (+39)
2,207 outbreaks (+64)

The latest hospital data showed 1,977 beds in use by confirmed or suspected COVID-19 patients, up 37 from Monday. Colorado's three-day average positivity rate for Monday was 11.63%. The state's goal is to remain below 5%.

2:50 p.m. | Several Denver COVID-19 testing sites closed Wednesday

Several Denver COVID-19 testing sites will be closed Wednesday, presumably due to cold temperatures expected throughout the day:

• Green Valley Ranch Pool
• Denver Human Services East
• Ruby Hill
• Paco Sanchez Park

The sites are expected to be open Thursday and Friday.

2 p.m. | Fauci says Colorado — like rest of U.S. — could see "surge upon surge" of COVID-19 during holidays

Dr. Anthony Fauci, the nation's top infectious disease specialist, said Tuesday that the surge of coronavirus cases in Colorado mirrors the nationwide spread COVID-19 and that holiday gatherings could lead to a "surge upon a surge" in the coming weeks, even as a vaccine nears distribution.

Still, Fauci was hesitant to recommend considering lockdown-style restrictions, unless hospital capacity begins to become overrun, warning that a lockdown could amplify "COVID fatigue."

Fauci was speaking in a joint virtual news conference with Colorado Gov. Jared Polis about COVID-19 in Colorado. The state reported 4,405 new cases Tuesday, and Polis, who was infected with the virus last week, is still isolating at home.

Much of Fauci's input Tuesday was generalized to the issue of COVID-19 across the nation, not specifically to Colorado.

He emphasized the importance of the next month and the need to remain socially distant, wear masks and avoid large congregate settings, such as limiting family gatherings and in-person Christmas shopping. And while cases continue to surge, there is hope on the horizon with multiple COVID-19 vaccines soon to be distributed.

Fauci said up to 20 million Americans could begin receiving the vaccine this month and that the general population should have access to the vaccine by April. Fauci urged Americans to get the vaccine, when available, saying he is confident the vaccine is safe and that he will be taking it himself.

"Vaccines are literally on the threshold for us," Fauci said. "We just need to hang together a bit longer."

Fauci encouraged Americans to "hang in there."

"Help is on the way, and we are going to get out of this," Fauci said. "We are going to get through this, and we will be back to normal the way we were before this plague hit us."

In the meantime, Polis and Fauci stressed the need for wearing a mask. Both acknowledged that mask-wearing is not a perfect preventative measure. But Fauci emphasized that data shows that wearing a mask does reduce the spread of COVID-19.

"If no one wore masks, you would see many more acquisitions and transmissions of infections," Fauci said. "We don't want the expectation of the perfect to be the enemy of the good that masks can do."

Fauci and Polis were both asked about Mayor Michael Hancock's recent travel for the Thanksgiving holiday. Hancock had urged Denverites to avoid traveling for Thanksgiving but flew to Mississippi to spend the holiday with his wife and daughter.

Fauci said, in general, that "mixed messaging" from those in authority could be "detrimental to the purpose you are trying to get a message for."

Polis wished Hancock well and said he hopes that he does not become infected with the virus.

Polis over the weekend announced that he and his partner, First Gentleman Marlon Reis, tested positive for COVID-19. Polis said he and Reis are feeling well and recovering at home.

Click here to read the full story.

12:45 p.m. | No fans at Ball Arena for Nuggets Game

The Denver Nuggets announced Tuesday that due to local and state guidelines, they will not host fans at Ball Arena (formerly Pepsi Center) for now. The Nuggets will work with Kroenke Sports & Entertainment and local and state authorities to navigate when and how to safely bring fans back.

10:50 a.m. | Colorado Hospital Association release resource to help rural health care systems

Colorado Hospital Association (CHA) and its partners released a new resource — a playbook called "Re-imagining Leadership: A Pathway for Rural Health to Thrive in a COVID-19 World" — to assist rural health care systems across the country develop emergency response plans for COVID-19.

The playbook seeks to empower leaders in rural health care and help them create specific responses that take into consideration their specific communities.

Rural areas of the United States have been particularly hard-hit by the COVID-19 pandemic. This new resource was created to help those rural health care leaders through these challenges

“There can be no scripted guide or silver bullet to address the unique challenges faced by each rural community,” said Benjamin Anderson, CHA vice president of rural health and hospitals. “That is why this playbook offers a framework that can be tailored to fit the individual strengths, challenges and identities of our rural partners here in Colorado and across the country.”

8:55 a.m. | Some spectators allowed at state football championships

According to an announcement from the Colorado Department of Public Health & Environment, a maximum of 75 spectators per team will be permitted in the stands during each state championship football game this weekend.

CHSAA commissioner Rhonda Blanford-Green on Monday night that the agency "has modified its position on spectators to allow a maximum of 75 spectators in the stands, per team, which is the limit of the outdoor seated events guidance provided in Public Health Order 20-36 COVID-19 Dial."

Read the full story here.

8:20 a.m. | Dr. Fauci joining Gov. Polis during update on Colorado's response to COVID-19

Gov. Polis will provide an update on the state’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic at noon Tuesday. Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, will join him.

Denver7 will stream this on our mobile, Roku, Apple TV or Amazon Fire apps, as well as on our Facebook page.

8:10 a.m. | CU Boulder pauses men's basketball program

The University of Colorado Athletic Department says it has temporarily paused men's basketball program operations due to COVID-19. This has forced the postponement of Wednesday's scheduled Pac-12 Conference opener at Arizona.

Monday, Nov. 30

4 p.m. | Latest COVID-19 numbers for Colorado

Here are the latest coronavirus numbers for Colorado, as of 4 p.m. Monday, with the change from Sunday in parentheses.

232,905 cases (+4,133)
13,488 hospitalized (+60)
64 counties (+0)
1,754,047 (+16,095)
3,218,851 test encounters (+43,725)
3,037 deaths among cases (+34)
2,656 deaths due to COVID-19 (+135)
2,143 outbreaks (+7)

The latest hospital data showed 1,940 beds in use by COVID-19 patients or suspected COVID-19 patients, up 93 from Sunday. Sunday's three-day average positivity rate for Colorado was 11.71%. Colorado's goal is to remain below 5%.

1:40 p.m. | Town of Parker encouraging residents to support local businesses

The Town of Parker is encouraging people to shop locally this holiday season to support businesses during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Parker has relaunched their online business platform and mapping tool to help residents easily find local businesses to support.

Businesses in Parker interested in being added to the platform can submit their information here.

1:15 p.m. | Douglas County Fairgrounds COVID-19 testing site reaches capacity, closes for the day

The Douglas County Fairgrounds STRIDE testing site closed Monday around 12:30 p.m. after reaching capacity for the day, according to Douglas County officials.

A free COVID-19 testing site in the rear parking lot of the Canvas Credit Union in Lone Tree remains open. It's open daily from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.

For a list of other testing locations in Douglas County, click here.

10:54 a.m. | Elbert County Public Health reports their metrics align with Level Red

In less than a week, Elbert County Public Health reported 66 new cases of PCR-confirmed COVID-19 cases.

Ages for the cases range from 10 months to 74 years.

There were two new cases of serology-confirmed COVID-19 cases. Elbert County has seen a total of 599 PCR-confirmed cases and 42 serology-confirmed cases.

Elbert County Public Health reported one new hospitalization. In November, they reported ten hospitalizations.

The county’s two-week cumulative incidence rate stands a 726.97 cases per 100,000 population. The two-week average positivity is 15.52%, well over the recommended positivity rate of 5%.

According to Elbert County Public Health, their metrics now align with Level Red on the state’s COVID-19 dial.

9:30 a.m. | COVID-19 testing site at Paco Sanchez Park reopens

After temporarily closing last week, the COVID-19 testing site at Paco Sanchez Park has reopened. There was a long line at the center Monday morning when it opened at 8 a.m

Click here for the COVID-19 live blog from Nov. 23-Nov. 9, 2020.