Millions of Internet users experience delays after biggest cyber-attack of its kind in history

Millions of Internet users experienced delays Wednesday during what experts are calling the biggest cyber attack of its kind in history.

People around the world experienced delays accessing certain web sites and services like Netflix.

Experts are concerned the attack could escalate to affect banking and email systems, according to the BBC.

The attacks started March 19 after the spam-fighting group, Spamhaus, blocked servers maintained by the Dutch company Cyberbunker, the New York Times reported.

Cyberbunker offers hosting services to any web site, "except child porn and anything related to terrorism,” the newspaper reported.

Spamhaus accused Cyberbunker of working with criminal gangs from Eastern Europe and Russia to launch the attack, the BBC reported.

The attacks are generated by swarms of computers called 'botnets,' Patrick Gilmore, chief architect at Akamai Networks, a digital content provider, told the New York Times. Botnets concentrate huge data streams -- some larger than the Internet connections of entire countries.

Experts say the attack is jamming crucial infrastructure around the world.

Officials with Spamhaus told the BBC the scale of the attack was unprecedented.

Five national cyber-police-forces are investigating, the BBC said.