Colorado lawmakers introducing controversial bills; Some have already failed in previous years

DENVER - State lawmakers are back to work this week and we're identifying some of the introduced bills you should know about.

Inspired by the Bill Cosby sexual assault allegations, there is a bipartisan bill to remove the state's 10-year statute of limitations on sexual assault cases. Currently, adult victims of sexual assaults that happened more than 10 years ago can't see their suspect brought to trial.

There will also be a bill on teen sexting -- the sharing of nude images via text or app. The backers of the bill told Denver7 that it was crafted prior to recent cases in Canon City and Buena Vista.  The bill would create a lesser charge called, "misuse of electronic images by a juvenile," which would prohibit a teen from knowingly distributing or displaying a sexually explicit image. The current charge is a more serious, "sexual exploitation of a child."

For the fourth time since 2011, Republican lawmakers will try to pass a fetal homicide bill. The bill would create a lesser charge called, "misuse of electronic images by a juvenile," which would prohibit a teen from knowingly distributing or displaying a sexually explicit image. The current charge is a more serious, "sexual exploitation of a child."

There are two democratic bills that would allow Coloradans the "right to die" if they meet certain circumstances. The person must be an adult resident of Colorado who has a terminal illness and voluntarily asks to be prescribed medication to assist in their end of life. They must make the request orally twice, along with a written request to their attending physician. There would also be a list of requirements that the physician must follow.

There is another bill that would alter death penalty cases. Currently, a unanimous decision is needed in all three phases of sentencing. The legislation would change the death penalty requirement from unanimous in all three sentencing phases, to having the support of nine of out 12 jurors.

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