No bond for suspect in deadly, Colorado Springs Planned Parenthood shooting

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. - The man accused of shooting three people to death inside a Planned Parenthood clinic in Colorado Springs on Friday faced a judge Monday afternoon.

Robert Lewis Dear, 57, stayed at the jail, but appeared in court via video conference. 

From the courthouse, the judge advised Dear that he is facing a charge of murder in the first degree and if convicted, will face a sentence ranging from life in prison to the death penalty.

The judge advised Dear of his rights and told him there is a mandatory protection order in place that restrains Dear from harassing, molesting, intimidating or retaliating against any victim or witness in the case.

"The order remains in effect for the term of case," the judge said.

The judge told Dear that no bond has been set and that Dear's next court appearance will be December 9 for the formal filing of charges.

Dear said just two words in court Monday, "No questions," when the judge asked if Dear had any questions.

Dear is accused of killing University of Colorado-Colorado Springs officer Garrett Swasey and two civilians during a shooting last Friday at a Planned Parenthood clinic in Colorado Springs.

One of the civilian victims was identified as Jennifer Markovsky, 36. Family members said Markovsky had accompanied a friend to the clinic.

The other victim was identified as Ke'Arre Stewart, an Army veteran who served in Iraq and the father of two children.

Nine other people were hospitalized, including five officers.

About five hours after the attack started, authorities took Dear into custody.

Dear told authorities "no more baby parts" after being arrested, according to a law enforcement official.

It was part of a rambling statement that investigators are parsing to understand the reasoning behind the deadly attack.

The attack thrust the clinic to the center of the debate over Planned Parenthood, which was reignited in July when anti-abortion activists released undercover video they said showed the group's personnel negotiating the sale of fetal organs.

Planned Parenthood has denied seeking any payments beyond legally permitted reimbursement costs for donating the organs to researchers.

Planned Parenthood cited witnesses as saying the gunman was motivated by his opposition to abortion.

U.S. Attorney John Walsh said investigators have been in touch with lawyers from the Justice Department's Civil Rights and National Security divisions, suggesting officials could pursue federal charges in addition to state homicide ones. One possible avenue is the 1994 Freedom of Access to Clinic Entrances Act, which makes it a crime to injure or intimidate clinic patients and employees.

All 15 clinic employees survived.

Acquaintances described Dear as an odd, reclusive loner.

Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper on CNN's State of the Union called the attack "a form of terrorism."

Investigators said Sunday it would take another 5-7 days to finish processing the crime scene.

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