PETA wants mom who found strange object in Campbell's chicken soup to go vegan

Sending No Chicken Noodle Soup by Amy's Kitchen

DENVER - PETA says it is sending a letter to the Broomfield mother who found a strange and unappetizing object in her daughter's canned soup.

In the letter, they suggest the mother and her family go vegan.

"I understand how upsetting it must have been to see what appeared to be an animal's body in your daughter's meal, and I hope that after having had this eye-opening experience, you and your family will stop eating all chickens (and cows, pigs, and fish, too) and go vegan," the letter from Alicia Woempner, PETA special projects manager said.

Woempner's letter said she is sending the mother, Nicole Montgomery, PETA's vegetarian/vegan starter kit and a one-month supply of delicious, healthy No Chicken Noodle Soup made by Amy's Kitchen.

Read the entire letter below.

Earlier this week, Montgomery told 7NEWS that she poured a single-serving can of Campbell's Chicken and Stars soup into a bowl to heat it up for her daughter, Molly, and that she noticed the strange lump when she took the bowl out of the microwave.

"I opened it up, and there was this spec in there -- I was like, 'What is that?' I looked a little bit closer and I was like, 'Oh, that looks like a dead chicken.'"

The object is shaped like a lima bean, nearly twice the size of the star-shaped noodles that give the soup its name. Several dark and narrow appendages reach upward from the core of the bean-shaped lump.

7NEWS reporter Russell Haythorn took the soup to an independent lab in Wheat Ridge to determine what the object is.

"The odds are it's just a veiny portion of the chicken," said Kathie Inman with Industrial Labs. "Those chickens are going to be pretty much de-boned and emptied before they're ever taken apart to go into a soup product."

Lab technician Kimberly Meinecke examined the specimen.

"It looks to be more like a tendon or cartilage that would be used to bind the muscle to the bone," said Meinecke. "It has that kind of toughness."

She added that unlike an embryo, the object in the soup has no definition.

"You would also see definition of the wings and/or feet," said Meinecke. "It's definitely not anything out of the ordinary when you're processing chicken."

Montgomery said she appreciates the results, but is still frustrated with Campbell's lack of consideration.

"The response I got yesterday from customer service was, I kind of got brushed off," she said.

However, Campbell's Soup Company has been very responsive with 7NEWS, since we initially aired the story Monday.

The company issued the following statement:

"Campbell Soup Company takes all claims of product contamination very seriously. Whenever we receive such a claim, it is fully investigated by our Quality Assurance team to determine its possible cause. We are in the process of evaluating the claim and have not yet received the exhibit from the consumer to conduct our investigation."

PETA letter:

March 20, 2014

Nicole Beckman-Montgomery

Dear Ms. Beckman-Montgomery,

I'm writing on behalf of People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) and our more than 3 million members and supporters, including thousands across Colorado, in reference to the bottle of Campbell's Chicken & Stars soup that you recently opened that contained a piece of meat resembling a small dead chicken. I understand how upsetting it must have been to see what appeared to be an animal's body in your daughter's meal, and I hope that after having had this eye-opening experience, you and your family will stop eating all chickens (and cows, pigs, and fish, too) and go vegan. To help you get started, I'm sending you PETA's vegetarian/vegan starter kit and a one-month supply of delicious, healthy No Chicken Noodle Soup made by Amy's Kitchen.

This incident serves as an important reminder that the animals who are often served up on a plate or in a bowl as shreds, chunks, or slices were all unique individuals who felt pain and fear and didn't want to die. Chickens, for example, have good memories and can even learn basic math skills. In nature, these birds would live in groups with their relatives and love and take care of their family members. In fact, mother chickens will often "talk" to their babies by clucking to them while they are still in their shells. But on factory farms, chickens are denied everything that is natural and important to them. They are crammed into filthy sheds by the tens of thousands and can suffer from severe ammonia burns from living amid their own waste. At the slaughterhouse, they are shackled upside down by their legs and have their throats slit while they are still conscious. Many birds are still alive when they are plunged into the scalding-hot water of the defeathering tank. By going vegan, you can save more than 100 animals a year from this kind of cruelty.

I urge you to take a few minutes to watch PETA's "Glass Walls" video, narrated by Paul McCartney, about the cruelty inherent in raising and killing animals for food and to visit PETA.org for more tips and recipes that can help your family transition to a healthy vegan diet, which is free of cholesterol, cruelty, and, of course, dead animals. I wish you and your family all the best, and I hope you enjoy the No Chicken soup.

Kind regards,

Alicia Woempner

Special Projects Manager

 

 

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