Colorado governor's office responds to New Jersey Governor Chris Christie's criticism of pot laws

DENVER - The Colorado governor's office is responding to New Jersey Governor Chris Christie's criticism of Colorado for its pot shops and legalized marijuana.

Monday, Christie was asked on a New Jersey radio station about legalizing marijuana. He responded, "For the people who are enamored with the idea with the income, the tax revenue from this, go to Colorado and see if you want to live there."

Gov. Hickenlooper's office defended Colorado and said many people want to live here.

"A lot of people think Colorado is great place to live, work and play. Plus, we have a pretty awesome quality of life. But don’t take just our word for it … for example:

America’s Top States for Business
# 7 Colorado
#42 New Jersey

The Best State for Business and Careers
#5 Colorado
#32 New Jersey

Is your state creating jobs and economic growth?
#14 in economic performance, Colorado
#33 in economic performance, New Jersey
#2 for innovation and entrepreneurship, Colorado
#14 for innovation and entrepreneurship, New Jersey
#8 for business climate, Colorado
#49 for business climate, New Jersey

The States of Our Union ... Are Not All Strong / We ranked all 50, from fabulous to failed.
#7 Colorado
#12 New Jersey

Find Out How Your Community Measures Up / State ranks
#7 Colorado
#23 New Jersey

Top State Technology and Science
#4 Colorado
#15 New Jersey"

Earlier this month, Christie said if people wanted legalized marijuana in New Jersey, they should elect a new governor.

"See if you want to live in a major city in Colorado where there's head shops popping up on every corner and people flying into your airport just to come and get high. To me, it's just not the quality of life we want to have here in the state of New Jersey and there's no tax revenue that's worth that," Christie said, according to KMBC.com.

USA Today reported that some forms of medical marijuana in New Jersey are legal, such as edible marijuana, but the law Christie signed last year applies only to children who have the approval of a physician and a psychiatrist.

Print this article Back to Top