Amnesiac petitioning White House for new social security number recalls flashes of life in Colorado

DENVER - Eight years ago, a brutal attack left Benjaman Kyle with a form of amnesia and no memory of who he was before. Now, he's asking for help to begin a new life.

"You don't know who I am and, quite frankly, neither do I," he said.

In 2004, his life changed forever in the parking lot of a Georgia Burger King where head trauma from a beating left him with retrograde amnesia. Only small slivers of his memory have ever returned, including snapshots of being in Colorado.

He remembers Colfax Avenue, the library at CU Boulder and plans for the building of the light rail system.

Now homeless in Jacksonville, Florida, Benjaman is still struggling to build a new life for his new identity. Without a social security card, however, he says it's been hard.

Without a social security number he "can't rent an apartment. They all require a social security number so they can do a security check. [I] can't open a bank account, can't do anything."

"It's like I'm a ghost walking through the country - I don't exist," he said.

Benjamin has a petition on the White House website. If he can collect 25,000 signatures by the end of Christmas Day, the president's administration will look into his request for a new social security number.

As of 6:15 p.m. Monday, he was still 9,151 signatures short.

"It would just make life so much easier," Benjamin said.

For now, Benjamin is living in a donated shed. Without any inkling of his real identity, officials can't track down his original identity.

Even the FBI has looked into his case, but was unable to track down any answers.

His story was featured in a documentary film called, "Finding Benjamin."