Volunteers help get medical attention to those in need

Thousands around the world get needed medical care

CENTENNIAL, Colo. - Thousands of people the world over are getting the medical attention they need thanks to an idea that started here in Colorado.

7Everyday Heroes Millie and David Truitt help make it happen. They volunteer at Centennial, Colorado based Project Cure.

 "We're the largest provider of donated medical supplies and equipment to people living in the third world," said Douglas Jackson, Project Cure President and CEO.

David has learned to be a load master, packing semi-trucks with medical gear for other nations.

"I am a physical therapist and so I am medically inclined and this is an organization that helps people throughout the world get medical care they couldn't get otherwise," said volunteer David Truitt.

"Some of it is overstock.  When's the last time you used all the shampoo at the hotel?  It's that kind of thing," said Jackson.

David's wife, Millie volunteers at Project Cure too.

"When I retired as an E.R. nurse I was looking for a place where I could use my medical knowledge and serve the Lord and this has been that kind of place," said volunteer Millie Truitt.

"We measure our volume by semi-truck trailers. Last year we did 130 semi-truck trailers," said Jackson.

Millie and David have been helping get that overstock out the door for 12 years.

 "Five days a week, and usually six to seven hours a day," said Millie.

"They work so hard here, and they own it.  There are parts here of this warehouse that I won't touch because they belong to Millie. And I don't know a better load master than Dave," said Jackson.

Project Cure only employs 25 people nationwide because it has 15,000 loyal volunteers like David and Millie.

"We are doing God's work and it's just the right thing to do," said David.

To learn more about Project Cure go to www.projectcure.org