Delta Says Glitch Led To Wrong Prices

Onlines Prices For Airlines Not Always Correct

Many travelers depend on airline websites for the best deal, but one airline acknowledges that wasn’t always the case.

Officials with Delta Airlines confirm to 7NEWS that computer problems led to inconsistent pricing. In some cases, passengers who logged on with their frequent flyer numbers were quoted higher fares compared to regular customers.

The airline said the trouble lasted for less than three weeks and was discovered by engineers. Officials said only a small number of people were impacted.

“We have been investing in our website and the technology that supports it for over a year. Recently, we updated our search function as part of a phased approach to improve the site. Shortly after making the updates, we discovered that it produced inconsistent results for logged-in and non-logged-in customers. We evaluated the situation carefully and rolled back to our prior search function, which resolved the issue,” said Delta Air Lines spokesperson Paul Skrbec in a statement to 7NEWS.

“With everybody trying to save a few pennies here and there, you know, it’s disappointing, disconcerting,” said Tammy Tinder, a Delta passenger flying from Denver to San Diego.

7NEWS wanted to know what would happen if you logged on today?

We looked for fares, as both a loyal customer and as a regular flyer.

The fares were the same.

We even conducted the same experiment with other airlines, including Frontier and United.

Frequent flyer or not, the fares were the same.

“Even when you feel like you’ve got an "in," you still need to check it out,” said Hope Marie Sneed of the Better Business Bureau.

“You need to get more than one pricing. We usually say three,” said Sneed.

Delta told 7NEWS the trouble was noticed internally and lasted for less than three weeks.

Passengers who feel they may have been overcharged may present their case to Delta for review.

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