New technology developed to help find missing children

Leo Watch reveals location of child faster

SAN DEIGO - A new device could help locate missing children faster than ever before.

Time and location are two crucial elements when it comes to finding a missing child. Now, a device worn on a child's wrist not only sends a 911 alert, its GPS tracking capability sends the location to a smartphone using a map application.

"It's like an OnStar system that's worn on the wrist," said Jason Sullivan, developer and founder of the Leo Watch.

The band on the Leo Watch is made from titanium, and tampering with it also sets off an alert to a 24-hour emergency call center. It also alerts parents who have downloaded the application to their smartphone or tablet.

"Some 2,000 children a day are reported missing in the U.S. each day," said Robert Lowery with the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children in Washington, D.C.

Most of them are runaways, Lowery said, but the fact remains time is a crucial enemy when it comes to finding missing children.

While the Center does not endorse specific products, technology is making it possible for more children to be found.

"We're finding even the most critically missing children more rapidly, but we have to do more because we're not finding them all," Lowery said.

The Leo Watch retails for about $150 and is due to be released in the spring.